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24

This is actually a good question, and one that we really don't have a good answer to. Intuitively it must be better than zero gravity, but the question is, will it be good enough. There are a host of problems associated with long term living in zero gravity, including loss of bone strength and others, it is not currently known if Mars is good enough. The ...


12

I'll expand on the other answers to address the duration of the sunrise and sunset at Mars' poles. Wikipedia sez for Mars: Axial tilt: 25.19° to its orbital plane and for Earth: Axial tilt 23.4392811° which are pretty similar. This answer puts a year at 668.6 days, which means that the Sun's elevation at the exact pole moves as $$\text{El}(t) = 25.19° \...


11

Let's quickly take a glance at the boundaries of the parameter space. As we know, the lower extreme, zero gravity, is pretty unhealthy for humans in the long term. Some effects have been known for some time, like bone and muscle deterioration, and effects linked to changed body fluid dynamics. Other effects were detected more recently, like the epigenetic ...


5

The short answer is: probably nothing significant. There have been multiple investigations into human circadian rhythms and their variations, especially in the absence of external clues regarding diurnal cycles and timekeeping. The best appears to be the 1974 paper by Mills et al.,"The circadian rhythms of human subjects without timepieces or indication of ...


3

You can find hundreds if not thousands of such photos by using the Planetary Data System search engine. Although most are not that "pretty". Here's a sample query for Mars, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, and Terminator. One of the images returned has this label DATA_SET_ID = "MRO-M-HIRISE-2-EDR-V1.0" DATA_SET_NAME = "MRO ...


3

Viking Orbiter "violet-light" picture 34A13, it shows the region east and northeast of the Argyre basin during winter in the southern hemisphere. (a) Most of the snow-covered Argyre basin is shown. This was taken just after the winter solstice when solar heating was minimal. Further down it says the location is 47° S, 22° W I found it in NASA-SP-441 ...


3

This paper1 states that there is a ...quasi-circular disturbed zone of 15-21 m radius (~990 m2) around InSight. Based on HiRISE imagery and views from InSight cameras. 1SURFACE ALTERATION FROM LANDING INSIGHT ON MARS AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR SHALLOW REGOLITH STRUCTURE.


3

No. There is no need for windows, from a technical perspective. Humans like windows, or at least display screens so they can see what's going on, avoid going stir-crazy from living in a capsule for months etc.. In reality, windows will be as small as possible, as they are on any high stress vehicle (aircraft or spaceships) because they are a likely failure ...


3

Reference [1] describes the finding of jarosite in the Mawrth Vallis region of Mars. The NASA Mars rovers include IR spectroscopy in their instrumentation, and that was the method used. The finding of potassium jarosite, $\text{KFe}_3\text{(SO}_4\text{)}_2\text{(OH}\text{)}_6$, is rendered graphically in thus figure taken from the reference. The jarosite ...


3

Since a Martian year works out to 668.5991 Sols, the Martian north pole would get a half a year of daylight, about 334 Sols, and a little less than half of a Martian a year of night. I don't know how many Sols of twilight the pole would get.


2

Same as on Earth's poles, long nights and long days, depending on the season.


2

One thing you might want to do is be prepared for some low numbers. Even during a storm, the density of Martian dust in the air is much less than that of the gases. According to Martin[1]: During the peak of the 1977b storm, a total dust mass of approximately 4.3 × 10^(14) g was suspended, equivalent to 4.3 × 10^(−4) g/cm^2, or a layer 1.4 μm thick. ...


2

The two antennas need to point at Earth during morning and evening on Mars. They are oriented in opposite directions so that one can be used in the morning and one in the evening. The science goal requires continuous contact over several years, so all the relative orientation changes of the antennas due to the movement of Mars need to be taken into account. ...


2

A DUSTY SUNSET ON MARS, While bogged down at Troy, Spirit looked westward on the evening of sol 2,002 to watch the Sun set. Before it reached the horizon, the Sun vanished into dust kicked up in a regional dust storm. This animation is composed of 11 Pancam frames captured over 12 minutes; they have been artificially colorized to add drama. GIF at planetary....


2

PIA10244: Earth and Moon as Seen from Mars article you link to links to the JPL image catalog page PIA10244: Earth and Moon as Seen from Mars which says: The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera would make a great backyard telescope for viewing Mars, and we can also use it at Mars to view other planets. This is an image of Earth and ...


2

Are they building on mars or do they have a camp there? No and No! Part of the problem is the Mars One scam. You can see there are many posts here specifically containing the search term "Mars One": https://space.stackexchange.com/search?q=%22mars+one%22 and despite all of the hype, we can take the word of Canadian astronaut, space musician and public ...


2

The paper "Initial results from the InSight mission on Mars" published on 24 February 2020 in the journal Nature Geoscience states HP$^3$ and RISE have not yet collected sufficient data for meaningful analysis; thus their results will not be discussed here. The webpage for RISE does not report any problems with that instrument. In contrast, NASA has ...


1

The second hit in a search produced this quote from a team member So members of the team have worked out a compromise. "When the planets align and we're able to work during our daytime and Martian nighttime, then we work every day, and then when they don't, we work every other day. And there's plenty of science analysis to be done on the ground in ...


1

Well, Scott Kelly and a Russian cosmonaut (don't remember his name anymore) survived in microgravity for more than a year (continuously) and re-accustomed back to 1 g on Earth. On Mars, the crew would spend about a year and this time in gravity so even though the gravity is much lower it would be better to adapt to it and re-adapt to the Earth's gravity than ...


1

Here is an image of Mars from an altitude of about 200 statute miles, I suppose. Unfortunately I don't know its precise altitude and which probe shot it. There are hardly descriptions of it.


1

ok so with a quick search since mars gets 44% of the light on earth. so with some math we get about 1.5 lx but wait, mars's atmosphere is different than earth's we can assume mars's twilight is around 1 lx or at least less than 1.5 lx. Now keep in mind this is using civil twilight measurements. This is as far as I can go to answering but I think it's safe to ...


1

Let's see if the physics of collecting ion propellant from atmospheres makes sense first. Using the vis-viva equation and the standard gravitational parameters for the two extreme cases that you've asked about, we can see what those orbital velocities might be for a circular orbit near the atmosphere (I'll use 5% larger than the planet's radius, it doesn't ...


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