New answers tagged

7

Partial answer (not touching the economic issues) (I asked an older question about the economics here myself Documented economics of STS Solid Rocket Booster reuse? but have not received a satisfactory answer) Shuttle SRBs were built out of segments and reuse was at the segment level. This illustration shows the 11 segments that made up a single booster. (...


13

Like the first stage, SpaceX catches them and reuses them Or at least that's the plan. They had their first successful single fairing catch in January this year, and their first successful double fairing catch in July. A new fairing costs around \$6m (\$3m per half), so reusing them reduces the cost of launches still further. The fairing shells come down ...


25

A payload fairing is separated as soon as possible when the air is so thin that the payload needs no protection anymore. This reduces the weight of the remaining rocket. The fairing is usally separated at a height of about 100 km before the rocket is orbital. Therefore the fairing has a suborbital flight and reenters the athmosphere. Separating the fairing ...


4

There is no inherent limit. As long as a fairing can be retrieved, and repaired if necessary from seawater corrosion or landing impact, it can be reflown. A fairing has no parts that wear out due to use per se, like a car tire's tread or an Apollo Command Module's heat shield. Its steerable parachutes need to be cleaned and repacked after a flight, but ...


4

For good statistics on things like this that change every mission, check out SpaceX Stats At the static moment I write this, 4 reused. SpaceX has a huge manifest of missions for Starlink, since even at 60 satellites a launch the full constellation of 4400 satellites is going to take a ton of launches (74 minimum! Almost as many launches as they had done in ...


5

https://www.teslarati.com/spacex-next-rocket-fairing-reuse-milestone/ Yes They have according to the linked article done so on three launches. This is coroborated by videos on youtube, among then from everyday astronaut.


2

Partial answer: According to other answers here, Centauri Dreams posts things that don't always necessarily work. See for example Is this description of the "dipole drive" and how it would work physically correct? Could a spacecraft be propelled by a 180 degree deflection of two charged particle beams? According to your linked post the idea was ...


3

There is no economy here. The local residents' profit is that they do not buy materials and finished products, such as boats, sleigh. Because they live in extremely remote places and transport costs make such things significantly more expensive than they cost in cities. An example of this is the documentary series "Happy People". Episode "...


3

According to this article on nasaspaceflight.com the vessel has a dynamic positioning system, which is a number of small thrusters that allow the boat to move in almost any direction. This is operated either with a computerized system, or manually using a joystick, though it is unclear which mode Ms. Tree (as Mr. Steven has since be re-named) uses. I can ...


Top 50 recent answers are included